Category Archives: Cadet Chat

NMMI Receives High Marks from AdvancED Assessment

School Cited Again for Continuing Educational Excellence

New Mexico Military Institute received accreditation for the maximum period by AdvancED, the largest community of education professionals in the world–a non-profit, non-partisan organization that conducts rigorous, on-site reviews of a variety of educational institutions and systems to ensure that all learners realize their full potential. “While our (AdvancED’s) expertise is grounded in more than a hundred years of work in school accreditation, AdvancED is far from a typical accrediting agency. Our goal isn’t to certify that educational institutions are good enough. Rather, our commitment is to help these institutions continuously improve.”

Of 31 Institution ratings across three Domains (Leadership, Learning, Resource), NMMI received 0 (zero) findings of “Needs Improvement” and 23 findings of “Exceeds Expectations.” NMMI was cited for three Powerful Practices: 1) Commitment to NMMI’s Strategic Plan; 2) A strong, formalized system of supportive adults dedicated to student success; and 3) effective and efficient use of resources in support of NMMI’s mission. Powerful Practices reflect noteworthy observations and actions that have yielded clear results in student achievement or organizational effectiveness and are actions that exceed what is typically observed or expected in an institution.

 AdvancED performed their review of NMMI early in 2018 and released their findings recently with, “It was evident throughout the review that continuous improvement was valued as a driving force for NMMI.”  Furthermore, “The (AdvancED) Team recognized that the New Mexico Military Institute is a magnificent guided testing site to carry out the institution’s mission and vision.  It is emphatically poised for even higher levels of excellence.  Centering future growth on the actions in this review has the potential to propel the institution to its desired internal level of excellence and distinction, making it a sustainable, replicable model across the world.”

Accreditation is not a one-time event. AdvancED-accredited schools must commit to continuous improvement every year and be re-accredited every five years. Accreditation is intended to protect schools, employers, and students. It guarantees that a particular high school is teaching its students at a level that is acceptable nationally.

Thus, when students acquire an NMMI diploma, they can be assured that colleges will accept it and recognize NMMI’s inherent educational value. Similarly, when colleges accept students, they can be assured that an NMMI cadet/scholar has received a quality education from an accredited school.

Located in Roswell, New Mexico, the New Mexico Military Institute offers a rich history and tradition of educating tomorrow’s leaders through a program of strong, challenging academics, leadership preparation, and character development. Known as “The West Point of the West,” NMMI remains the only land-grant co-educational college preparatory high school and junior college in The United States. Serving the educational needs of an international student population, the Institute has strict admissions standards that yearly result in an enrollment of approximately 1,000 students who come from more than 36 states, 2 US territories (Puerto Rico and American Samoa), and 33 foreign nations.

NMMI grants High School diplomas and Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees. The Institute’s emphasis on qualities of honor, integrity, and responsibility, contributes to its unique educational philosophy. Leadership training is provided to all cadets at the college level, through the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program, and at the high school level through the Junior ROTC program. The ROTC Program offers college cadets the opportunity to receive a commission in the U.S. Army through the 2-Year Early Commissioning Program. Cadets may pursue commissions in the U.S. Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marines through the Service Academy Preparatory Program.

NMMI graduates prove successful in every field of endeavor, business, industry, public service, education, the professions, or careers in the military. National statistics and surveys of graduating classes show consistently that 95 percent of NMMI graduates go on to complete a four-year degree at outstanding schools such as Penn State, Stanford, Rice, Cornell, University of Texas, Arizona State University, University of Colorado, and the nation’s Service Academies.

Happy Holidays from NMMI!

On behalf of everyone at New Mexico Military Institute, we wish you and your family a very joyous holiday season and a Happy New Year!

Holidays at New Mexico Military Institute!

By Cadet Alan Romero

Celebrating the holiday season at NMMI is a blast! Even though cadets are stressing about final exams after Thanksgiving break, celebrating the holidays at NMMI is special because of the friends that are made here. During the holidays, being with friends is like being with family on Christmas morning. That warm feeling enables cadets to ease the stress off of finals and focus more on resting and having fun. That said, participating in holiday events with friends at NMMI include having fun at the corps-wide Superintendent’s Christmas party, NMMI club Christmas parties, holiday etiquette dinners, troop Secret Santa’s, and decorating rooms.

Diversity at NMMI is Shaping My Future

By Cadet Rafael Valles

College years provide more than just academics, but opportunities for students to have exposure to other backgrounds and cultures. The world is an extremely complex, everchanging place, and entering a diverse and inclusive learning environment is very important for me and other applicants that hope to attend New Mexico Military Institute. I am a Puerto Rican/Mexican-American (tricultural) bringing my social values and diverse ideals. As a Hispanic student, I realize how important diversity is; for example, New Mexico Military Institute’s diverse culture, allows me to create long lasting friendships and insight on the importance of cultural diversity. The Corps of Cadets here at NMMI is no joke as it is  ranked #1 in diversity by Boarding School Review. The characters and personalities I found here are completely different compared to other schools that I have attended. The relationships I have created here are unique, and each person I have met has a special quality about them that has allowed me to acknowledge both their character and culture. I can truly say that while attending a university, diversity plays a huge role in one’s life.

When seeking diversity on campus here at NMMI, I looked at many opportunities to express myself and find a community with others. I felt that the opportunities available to me from the different cultures and backgrounds at NMMI made me realize that different views and ideas can be positive and meaningful in many different ways.

My goal is to become a U.S. Army commissioned officer, because I want to serve my country and become a better leader. Being involved in the Early Commissioning Program (ROTC Program), I experienced diversity in working with ROTC cadets from around the world. Here at NMMI, I noticed that the various leadership styles being used in ROTC has its own repertoire of social values and techniques. I found this to be an impact of my leadership in showing me the assortment of skills used to view and solve objectives differently. Another great honor I gained from diversity is being bilingual and utilizing it in the Admissions Office, recruiting/ assisting future cadets from around the world. Not only that, but being the Regimental S-2 Provost Marshall Officer, interaction among many Spanish speaking cadets gained me more respect, credibility, and authority around the corps. Having all these experiences, coming to understand how the range of students interact in a college creates a specific work culture and environment that follows the ideals of NMMI’s honor code: Duty, Honor, and Achievement.

Diversity has helped to shape my future for an ever changing and dynamic education, and effort invested in my leadership will reflect upon my lifestyle for years to come. NMMI is very diverse across all factors. Passing my wisdom and knowledge to my longtime friends here at NMMI, I will continue to learn and prepare myself and others for the demanding role I hope to soon undertake in my life, and I can only thank NMMI for it.

 

 

 

Some Advice for Close Quarters…

 

By Cadet Brooke Morgan

When you get to N.M.M.I you have to get used to many things.  Wearing a uniform, getting up early, getting use to people telling you what to do and much more. One of the biggest things that I had to get used to was sharing a room with someone. When I was younger I had to share a room with my sister but that was about ten years ago so I was out of practice.

When I got to N.M.M.I I was praying to have a room to myself but like most of my hopes during R.A.T week it was crushed for the greater good. At first my roommate Maddi and I were happy that we were not weird and annoying but that soon changed. By the end of the week, she was trying to move me out and I was ready to take her key and never let her back in.

Even with our rocky beginning the funny thing is Maddi and I are roommates this year too. We still get on each other’s nerves because we both don’t like to compromise on much of anything– but that being said we also have gotten a good routine down that ensures that we both are mostly happy even if that means that I have to give away some of my comforts and she has to vacuum before Formal Room Inspections or FRIs!

We made it through and learned a lot about being roommates. Some of my R.A.Ts are having the same problems that we had and what I have to tell them include:

You both are going through new experiences take time to get to know each other and be patient with one another, because sometimes you can act differently when you’re your thrown into a lifestyle change like N.M.M.I.

You do not need to be the best of friends with the person you share a shoebox with sometimes the best relationship you can have with your roommate is a working one.

Find a routine that works for you and your new roomie. Maddi and I have routines for everything we do on a daily basis. In the morning when you have to wake up before the sun, I do my hair while she gets ready, and I get ready when she does her hair. When we get ready for any room inspections, I clean sinks and windows as she vacuums and cleans mirrors.

Even if your best friends with your roommate have your own group of friends and activities, so when you need to get away from each other you have a way to.

Don’t leave your roommate hanging when it comes to getting up in the morning and even homework. Most likely you will have the same classes and teachers so work together to get things done. Maddi and learned that the most because even though we weren’t the best of friends we helped each other out when we needed it and it made a huge difference.

Maddi and I had some troubles when we started out and if you told me that we’d fight to room together this year too I would have laughed in your face. We have a good routine down and we work well together. If you have trouble with your roommate just be patient and kill them with kindness because learning to compromise is the biggest thing when it comes to working with your roommate. You walk into a room with someone you’ve never met take the time to get to know them it can work out for the best in the long run.