Tag Archives: growing up

Some Advice for Close Quarters…

 

By Cadet Brooke Morgan

When you get to N.M.M.I you have to get used to many things.  Wearing a uniform, getting up early, getting use to people telling you what to do and much more. One of the biggest things that I had to get used to was sharing a room with someone. When I was younger I had to share a room with my sister but that was about ten years ago so I was out of practice.

When I got to N.M.M.I I was praying to have a room to myself but like most of my hopes during R.A.T week it was crushed for the greater good. At first my roommate Maddi and I were happy that we were not weird and annoying but that soon changed. By the end of the week, she was trying to move me out and I was ready to take her key and never let her back in.

Even with our rocky beginning the funny thing is Maddi and I are roommates this year too. We still get on each other’s nerves because we both don’t like to compromise on much of anything– but that being said we also have gotten a good routine down that ensures that we both are mostly happy even if that means that I have to give away some of my comforts and she has to vacuum before Formal Room Inspections or FRIs!

We made it through and learned a lot about being roommates. Some of my R.A.Ts are having the same problems that we had and what I have to tell them include:

You both are going through new experiences take time to get to know each other and be patient with one another, because sometimes you can act differently when you’re your thrown into a lifestyle change like N.M.M.I.

You do not need to be the best of friends with the person you share a shoebox with sometimes the best relationship you can have with your roommate is a working one.

Find a routine that works for you and your new roomie. Maddi and I have routines for everything we do on a daily basis. In the morning when you have to wake up before the sun, I do my hair while she gets ready, and I get ready when she does her hair. When we get ready for any room inspections, I clean sinks and windows as she vacuums and cleans mirrors.

Even if your best friends with your roommate have your own group of friends and activities, so when you need to get away from each other you have a way to.

Don’t leave your roommate hanging when it comes to getting up in the morning and even homework. Most likely you will have the same classes and teachers so work together to get things done. Maddi and learned that the most because even though we weren’t the best of friends we helped each other out when we needed it and it made a huge difference.

Maddi and I had some troubles when we started out and if you told me that we’d fight to room together this year too I would have laughed in your face. We have a good routine down and we work well together. If you have trouble with your roommate just be patient and kill them with kindness because learning to compromise is the biggest thing when it comes to working with your roommate. You walk into a room with someone you’ve never met take the time to get to know them it can work out for the best in the long run.

 

How I Manage My Time at NMMI

By Cadet Marco Varela

It all starts with a mentality. There is little time to stand around and decide what to do next, there is always something to do and it pays to know what it is. NMMI sets you up for success by issuing a planner to write down everything your homework and tasks. However, there are alternatives. I personally prefer Google Calendar because it syncs across any device that I log onto, it sends me reminders, and it gives me a visual representation from which I can create a plan.

When I start the day, I maintain a routine of showering and grooming, cleaning my room, and reviewing my plan for the day. This includes checking my calendar, my email, and any post-it notes on my desk. It is crucial to begin with a direction in mind of how I want to run the day. By knowing due dates and the tasks of the day I know what to focus my valuable free time on. It is important to address that even with a plan and efficiently utilizing free time, some tasks may require even more time to accomplish. For example, my senior year of high school at NMMI I had a portion of my capstone paper, which determines of you graduate, due in the morning. It was 2200 and all I had was my works cited. I decided to go to bed and wake up at 0230 considering that I work better in the “morning.” Fortunately, I did well on that paper and graduated as Salutatorian, but my point is that even with an organized method there is still always room for improvement. Furthermore, sacrifices are necessary to succeed.

NMMI will test your abilities in multiple occasions. It will quite a determined attitude to accomplish tasks successfully. Being organized in the planning of my time helps me be successful and I believe it is worth trying for any cadet.

Top Pieces of Advice for New Cadets

By Cadet David Elias

Everyone who comes to NMMI starts off as a new cadet. Everyone has to go through the same process, which will take some getting used to. Many people’s lives are flipped upside down when they first arrived at NMMI, but all of these changes are for the best. While it may be difficult to become accustomed to this new life style, everything is done for a reason and to better you. These tips will help your transition into NMMI run a little more smoothly.

  • Listen to what the leadership tells you. Everything they tell you is for a reason. Everything you do at NMMI is for a reason. All of the seemingly unnecessary things they make you do as a RAT (Recruit At Training) and New Cadet have a very important purpose behind them. If you can figure this reason out on your own, or aren’t told by your leadership, ask.
  • Don’t talk back. Again, if everything is done for a reason. Don’t be the person that “doesn’t like to be corrected”. Every correction is made not to waste your time, but to make sure that you are following the rules, doing what you are supposed to, and to make you a better cadet. Corrections help you out believe it or not.
  • It is not hard to not get in trouble. There are very few things you have to do or worry about when you are a New Cadet. Your only responsibilities are to show up to formation, clean your room, be in the right uniform, listen to what you are told, be on time, and do your schoolwork. That’s it.
  • It’s also easy to get in trouble. Do the right thing, even when no one is looking. If you’re doing something that you know is against the rules, you will get in trouble, simple as that. Conduct yourself like a young adult and follow the rules, and you’ll avoid any discipline.

Why I Came to NMMI–And Why I’ve Stayed

By Cadet Diego Salido

One of the most repetitive questions I have been asked as a cadet is “Why are you at NMMI?”

Most people assume that I am a troublemaker and my parents sent me here to fix me, which is something that you will not find very often here at the Institute. Most of the people come here because of their own choice and because they are looking for a challenge. In my case, I came here following my brother’s example and his advice. He told me that it was the best choice I could make and that I would not regret it. I had to think about it for more than a year, and finally I decided that I wanted to accept the challenge. After my first year, the question became “Why did you stay” and the answer is really simple: I stayed because of the people–the family I found here, and the opportunity to be someone better. I do not regret a single thing since I got here and I have enjoyed my ride. I still have a year left until I graduate and I know that I will miss everything and everyone when I leave.

Salido

Financing the Education of Your Dreams

By: Kalith Smith, Director of Admission New Mexico Military Institute

Last year I celebrated the arrival of the entering class of 2016 with a day at the Living Desert State Park in Carlsbad, NM. The Office of Admission had worked hard to bring in the class, but I had my phone forwarded to me just in case. I didn’t expect anything too earth shattering to happen. Then my phone rang. As I helped my kids understand the history that carved out Carlsbad Caverns, the voice on the other end asked a few simple questions, “My nephew was supposed to come to NMMI for matriculation, but we had a funeral. Can he still come? What would he need to have pulled together?” I explained to his Aunt that based on his Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which all high school seniors should fill out online at fafsa.ed.gov, the student was getting an incredible value. He was receiving aid and scholarships based on his admission, his academic ability and his financial need, but the student did not understand. This student had started his journey to NMMI during an annual trip with the Pinon, Arizona JROTC Cadets to NMMI as part of the Navajo Nation Reservation. But when thinking about NMMI for college—he saw Roswell, NM as a bridge too far. But when his Aunt found out that the pieces for his future—especially financially could come together–he was on the road to NMMI! His family went all out to make sure he didn’t miss the opportunity.

Fast forward to December when his mom and grandmother picked him up for winter break. I had asked to meet them, so he brought them to my office. I saw his Best New Cadet (BNC) Boards and asked if they knew what that meant. These boards are highly prized and point to a rising star in the Corps of Cadets. Once I explained the boards, they were beaming. What had almost ended before it got started had a wonderful end to the first chapter of his story at NMMI. His performance at NMMI brought pride to him, his family and the entire Navajo Nation. His Aunt stepped in at just the right moment, asked just the right questions and made the effort to drive him to Roswell and ensure that he took advantage of this opportunity.

At NMMI, we work very hard to create opportunities for students that cannot be achieved anywhere else. Each accredited institution you are considering will have unique things to offer and you are left to make a decision on which road to choose. However, sometimes students stop themselves before they are able to find out what is possible. This happens all the time when students and families see the initial price tag for education and shy away, not taking the time to go through the process that would allow us to process the file for admission. Once a student is admitted, they are automatically considered for scholarships. At NMMI we don’t only look at your GPA and test score, we are also considering your past behavior, your leadership and any special ability as we award scholarships. In each situation we can’t tell you what you might be eligible for if you don’t complete your application! So, whatever school you are considering move through their process and find out what is possible before you declare it to be impossible. Now is the time, apply online, send in the necessary documents and see what might be possible. My student who almost stopped himself is up for a big promotion in the Corps of Cadets in the fall. He is incredible, but he needed to take a step out of his comfort zone (and he needed a little push from his family) to find out just how incredible he really is!

As Dr. Seuss wrote:

You’re off to great places! Today is your day! Your mountain is waiting! So…get on your way!