Tag Archives: growing up

Life After NMMI

By Cadet Elyssa Chino

My plans after New Mexico Military School are to transfer to another military school. Before NMMI, I never thought I would develop any interest in the military. I came from a military family, my dad, uncles, and grandfather all served in the USMC. Growing up I decided that military life was not for me, and I would contribute to the world in another way. However, upon graduating from NMMI, I fell in love with the military lifestyle. I am still well aware it is not for everyone. Not many people agree with the structured, rigid, and routine life but the challenge of it had me hooked. I appreciated how much stronger and capable I became, both mentally and physically. Of course, I had my days I did not want to wake up at 0600 to conduct morning Physical Training or conduct rifle drill for an hour in the hot sun. Not everyday was glamorous and totally at my disposal, but as I stated before, the accomplished feeling well was worth it at the end of every day. My days where busy, long, productive, and fulfilling. I desired to continue this military school journey. I came back to NMMI for junior college, which I will be graduating from in a couple months. Now my sights are set on The Citadel the Military College of the South. Once I attain my bachelor’s in political science, I plan to commission into the US Marine Corp as a 2nd Lieutenant. My biggest aspiration in life is to become an attorney and represent mistreated families in destitute countries. To me, the military makes perfect sense as it would fully equip me with the tactical and soft military skills necessary to care for myself, especially in high risk countries. Not only will it help strengthen my independence, but it will expand my knowledge of the world beyond my hometown, financially support me through law school, provide me with networking opportunities and give me new leadership experiences. Fortunately, NMMI has already provided me with these benefits during the time I have been here. I appreciate NMMI for sparking my interest and opening the door to the biggest plans of my life.

 

Leaving the Nest

My family’s experience of me at NMMI

By: Cadet Madison McLean

Growing up my mom always told my sister and I we were her little birds, always in her nest and when we were ready, we would have to leave the nest eventually. When I decided I wanted to go to NMMI, I was 15 years old. And I knew I was going to have to leave the nest for the next four years of high school. My parents were excited for me, it was a chance to get a great education and an experience of a life time. And the one rule my dad had for me was once I start NMMI I must finish. I started my first day at a preparatory summer camp for math and then transitioned into RAT week. During that period of time I couldn’t have my cell phone for three weeks. Throughout those three weeks I wrote to my little sister and parents on a weekly basis and it was hard on all of us as a family. My parents mailed me a package of school supplies and items I was running low on, and my dad hid a bag of my favorite candy in the package. Even though I wasn’t at home they still found a way to put a smile on my face.

When I saw my parents for my 21-day ceremony they told me how proud they were of me and I could see they missed me greatly. The first time I could take a furlough home, I sat down with my dad and he told me how much he missed me and that it wasn’t easy for my mom and him to send me to NMMI. But they had to make that sacrifice of not seeing me every day for giving me the best education possible. Every time I went home for a holiday, we always spent time together to make up for not being together often throughout the school years. As years went by and my four years came to a close, I realized I had a stronger relationship with my family, and they were able to accept me leaving my mom’s nest. Attending NMMI was not just an experience for me, but for my parents and sister as well. They were my biggest fans at all my games, my supporters through my academics, and with me every step of the way. If anything, they attended NMMI with me for those four years and we celebrated every moment together.

Some Advice for Close Quarters…

 

By Cadet Brooke Morgan

When you get to N.M.M.I you have to get used to many things.  Wearing a uniform, getting up early, getting use to people telling you what to do and much more. One of the biggest things that I had to get used to was sharing a room with someone. When I was younger I had to share a room with my sister but that was about ten years ago so I was out of practice.

When I got to N.M.M.I I was praying to have a room to myself but like most of my hopes during R.A.T week it was crushed for the greater good. At first my roommate Maddi and I were happy that we were not weird and annoying but that soon changed. By the end of the week, she was trying to move me out and I was ready to take her key and never let her back in.

Even with our rocky beginning the funny thing is Maddi and I are roommates this year too. We still get on each other’s nerves because we both don’t like to compromise on much of anything– but that being said we also have gotten a good routine down that ensures that we both are mostly happy even if that means that I have to give away some of my comforts and she has to vacuum before Formal Room Inspections or FRIs!

We made it through and learned a lot about being roommates. Some of my R.A.Ts are having the same problems that we had and what I have to tell them include:

You both are going through new experiences take time to get to know each other and be patient with one another, because sometimes you can act differently when you’re your thrown into a lifestyle change like N.M.M.I.

You do not need to be the best of friends with the person you share a shoebox with sometimes the best relationship you can have with your roommate is a working one.

Find a routine that works for you and your new roomie. Maddi and I have routines for everything we do on a daily basis. In the morning when you have to wake up before the sun, I do my hair while she gets ready, and I get ready when she does her hair. When we get ready for any room inspections, I clean sinks and windows as she vacuums and cleans mirrors.

Even if your best friends with your roommate have your own group of friends and activities, so when you need to get away from each other you have a way to.

Don’t leave your roommate hanging when it comes to getting up in the morning and even homework. Most likely you will have the same classes and teachers so work together to get things done. Maddi and learned that the most because even though we weren’t the best of friends we helped each other out when we needed it and it made a huge difference.

Maddi and I had some troubles when we started out and if you told me that we’d fight to room together this year too I would have laughed in your face. We have a good routine down and we work well together. If you have trouble with your roommate just be patient and kill them with kindness because learning to compromise is the biggest thing when it comes to working with your roommate. You walk into a room with someone you’ve never met take the time to get to know them it can work out for the best in the long run.

 

How I Manage My Time at NMMI

By Cadet Marco Varela

It all starts with a mentality. There is little time to stand around and decide what to do next, there is always something to do and it pays to know what it is. NMMI sets you up for success by issuing a planner to write down everything your homework and tasks. However, there are alternatives. I personally prefer Google Calendar because it syncs across any device that I log onto, it sends me reminders, and it gives me a visual representation from which I can create a plan.

When I start the day, I maintain a routine of showering and grooming, cleaning my room, and reviewing my plan for the day. This includes checking my calendar, my email, and any post-it notes on my desk. It is crucial to begin with a direction in mind of how I want to run the day. By knowing due dates and the tasks of the day I know what to focus my valuable free time on. It is important to address that even with a plan and efficiently utilizing free time, some tasks may require even more time to accomplish. For example, my senior year of high school at NMMI I had a portion of my capstone paper, which determines of you graduate, due in the morning. It was 2200 and all I had was my works cited. I decided to go to bed and wake up at 0230 considering that I work better in the “morning.” Fortunately, I did well on that paper and graduated as Salutatorian, but my point is that even with an organized method there is still always room for improvement. Furthermore, sacrifices are necessary to succeed.

NMMI will test your abilities in multiple occasions. It will quite a determined attitude to accomplish tasks successfully. Being organized in the planning of my time helps me be successful and I believe it is worth trying for any cadet.

Top Pieces of Advice for New Cadets

By Cadet David Elias

Everyone who comes to NMMI starts off as a new cadet. Everyone has to go through the same process, which will take some getting used to. Many people’s lives are flipped upside down when they first arrived at NMMI, but all of these changes are for the best. While it may be difficult to become accustomed to this new life style, everything is done for a reason and to better you. These tips will help your transition into NMMI run a little more smoothly.

  • Listen to what the leadership tells you. Everything they tell you is for a reason. Everything you do at NMMI is for a reason. All of the seemingly unnecessary things they make you do as a RAT (Recruit At Training) and New Cadet have a very important purpose behind them. If you can figure this reason out on your own, or aren’t told by your leadership, ask.
  • Don’t talk back. Again, if everything is done for a reason. Don’t be the person that “doesn’t like to be corrected”. Every correction is made not to waste your time, but to make sure that you are following the rules, doing what you are supposed to, and to make you a better cadet. Corrections help you out believe it or not.
  • It is not hard to not get in trouble. There are very few things you have to do or worry about when you are a New Cadet. Your only responsibilities are to show up to formation, clean your room, be in the right uniform, listen to what you are told, be on time, and do your schoolwork. That’s it.
  • It’s also easy to get in trouble. Do the right thing, even when no one is looking. If you’re doing something that you know is against the rules, you will get in trouble, simple as that. Conduct yourself like a young adult and follow the rules, and you’ll avoid any discipline.